______________ by (MATTHEWFRANKLIN)
massarrah:

Ivory Plaque from Old Assyrian Trading Colony
Incised with a griffin, this ivory plaque probably comes from an Old Assyrian trading colony in the ancient city of Acemhöyük in Anatolia. A legendary creature with the body, tail, and hind legs of a lion, and the head and forelegs of an eagle, the griffin appears in much art and iconography from the ancient Near East, though its precise function remains unclear. (Source)
Old Assyrian, c. 2000-1700 BCE.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
archaeology:


Take with a grain of salt, but still!


A “vampire grave” containing a skeleton with a stake driven through its chest has been unearthed by a man known as “Bulgaria’s Indiana Jones”.




Professor Nikolai Ovcharov – a crusading archaeologist who has dedicated his life to unearthing mysteries of ancient civilisations – said that he had made the discovery while excavating the ruins of Perperikon, an ancient Thracian city located in southern Bulgaria, close to the border with Greece.


The city, inhabited since 5,000 BC but only discovered 20 years ago, is believed to be the site of the Temple of Dionysius – the Greek God of wine and fertility. And among the finds at the site, which includes a hilltop citadel, a fortress and a sanctuary, are a series of “vampire graves”.


On Thursday Professor Ovcharov announced that he had found a remarkably-preserved Medieval skeleton at the site in what he termed “a vampire grave”.




"We have no doubts that once again we’re seeing an anti-vampire ritual being carried out," said Professor Ovcharov. He explained that the metal was driven through the corpse to stop a "bad" person from rising from the dead and terrorising the living.
"Often they were applied to people who had died in unusual circumstances – such as suicide."
The skeleton, thought to be of a man aged between 40 and 50, had a heavy piece of ploughshare – an iron rod, used in a plough – hammered through its chest. The left leg below the knee had also been removed and left beside the skeleton.

via
robyn-la:

Today in the world of archaeology: I found a chert projectile point base, while supervising a project! Awesome! 
design-is-fine:

Thomas Davison, The Fates, 1818. Originally situated as a group of three female figures at the Parthenon, or Temple of Minerva at Athens. Via Getty Open Content.
female-fitnessinspiration:

For More Visit Female Fitness Inspiration
archaeologychannel:

Did you know…A music chamber was recently discovered in the 5,000 year-old ancient city of Isos. To learn more about the excavation, read the article RIGHT HERE!
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